AC/DC’s “Walk All Over You”, The Schaffer Replica™ Series (A SoloDallas’ Cover) NOW WITH EQ Settings and RECORDING Details.

Settings? Rhythm settings.

31 Oct AC/DC’s “Walk All Over You”, The Schaffer Replica™ Series (A SoloDallas’ Cover) NOW WITH EQ Settings and RECORDING Details.

One of the first things that I want to let you know is that our videos won’t be blocked in any country from now on (unless they lock me up for copyright infringement, that is, which sooner or later they will and then some of you who have direct access to Mal or Ang will have to vouch for me). Our videos are now on our own server. Should be visible from any media player too, including the pads, peds, pods etc.

 

With that out of the way, let me tell you that it was a big challenge to cover this one, and it took us over one month.
Was it the solos? The rhythm part? What was so challenging? The rhythm sound. Boy what an Angus’ rhythm part they pulled. Not that they usually didn’t, I love ’em all, especially the older albums like this masterpiece album here, “Highway To Hell“. But this song was certainly no exception.

And let me say it immediately, I got close (eventually) but no guitar (as Ken Schaffer told me personally 😆 as a substitute for “close, but no cigar”).
It’s hard – very hard – to improvise myself as a tech of all sorts (guitar player, sound engineer, cameraman and video editor). Don’t get it as an excuse though, because I am loving each one of these roles to life (as opposed to the other way of saying). Only, it will take me some more time to master each one of these better, as I do intend to do to deliver quality from every drop of what I do. Because this is what I always wanted to do, and I tried for years and years as a hobby; now, thanks to the Schaffer-Vega Diversity System “discovery”, I am taking a serious chance at swapping these activities as my real job; meaning, full times, at least 8 hours a day, every day for the entire coming year (after which, I’ll summarise the results and see if it was worth it or not). But I have given myself this one year. So after all, I got my excuse for this year. And boy – if you know me at least one bit – am I going to give it all.

 

But I digress. The sound, we were saying. The sound of Ang’s guitar part got me here. Because you know, I did start tracking with “only” one microphone. If you remember that book “AC/DC In The Studio” which we mentioned here in the past, Highway To Hell was mentioned as having been recorded – guitar wise – with three microphones per cabinet, one cabinet for each brother. The microphones being, two Shure SM57s and one Sennheiser MD421. Basically – yes, you got it right – all dynamic microphones.

 

Naturally, since I didn’t own an MD421 (nor I wanted to) I started heavily rehearsing with the SM57 I had around.
I had been able to single out – in the past, if you remember – the fact that I was sure (fairly sure) that the whole “Highway To Hell” album must have been recorded with at least Angus playing on the Marshall Lead Master 2203; probably even Malcolm, but not sure about that yet.
With Angus, we can be 100% positive this was the choice (as it had been for the entire Powerage album, probably including Malcolm with it for its entirety). It is just sonically evident (and if it wasn’t, I guess you can take this video here as the definitive proof – as I have shot this one entirely with one of my three original, 1970s 2203s).

Settings? Rhythm settings.

Settings? Rhythm settings.

 

But nothing cut the original “vibe” of Angus’ sound with that single SM57 (i.e, “I” wasn’t able to). Also of note, in the room at the time (early September 2013) I only had a 1978/1979 Marshall 4×12 slanted cabinet with original Celestion G12-65s inside. If you strip Malcolm’s left channel and mono Angus’ right channel (which is how I “study” the sounds to begin with) you will probably hear, too, the character of Angus’ tone on this song.
It’s got a “clean” sounding “low end” (bass), then there seems to be clearly a lack of LMF (lower mid frequencies) and all of a sudden, the high mids and treble blossom in the most sophisticated possible way. A joy for the ears, I could say. A classic, beautiful Marshall sound of the old era. And mind you, cut with a “newer”, often disliked Marshall 2203!

 

A skilful catch indeed, from both the original sound engineer who did the tracking and Tony Platt’s & Lange’s sound editing afterwards.
I can not stress this enough. You have to know this. Over a month I have been after this daily the whole day (when I wasn’t working on other things – the recent TSR™ & RNR Relics videos, TSR Production, customer contacts etc.: it’s already gotten an action packed job! :lol:).
Still, I don’t think (no cigar) I matched it 100%. 100% is nowadays a possibility, so you don’t have to think that it is impossible. We have all kind of plug-in emulators of the older gear of the time, including consoles, compressors, tape recorders and the like. And I do have these and use them extensively each time (I use Universal Audio versions, that I like very, very much, as well as some Slate Digital components). I will detail my typical recording/editing process in the future; only, I didn’t want to give it “all away” at once nor I felt I was prepared to give you a qualitative insight on these things before I had a better grip on them myself.
Much likely – hoping you (our beloved members) won’t spit on our faces, we are going to make this community a pay-for community. Just something monthly, a little something, to help us survive (hey I got family!) and keep on maintain our online gear, pay for the costs etc. Will see when the time comes.

 

In short (more or less) I soon realised that, without an MD421, I was doomed (or I thought so). So… ebay is your friend. Bought two, both vintage ones. because rumour has it that the new model MkII has changed the sound (something of recent). The other versions of MkI MD421s from the various eras, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and 1990s should be more or less the same.

G93R1206

Yes, microphone(s) placement.

To make extra sure, I got one from the 1960s/1970s (comes in a beautiful light grey) and one from the 1980s (comes in black). I used the grey one, picture here with its SM57 in all of its splendour.  Then I started going for positions. Boy. Mind you, the picture shows you a 4×12 Marshall B cab with checkered cloth (VERY important!) and vintage G12Ms inside. Before I realised this had to be the case, I messed around with the other cabinet I had started with, i..e, my black cloth, Marshall 4×12 type A cabinet loaded with G12-65s. Basically, I was convinced that even Highway To Hell had been recorded with the then new, G12-65s. I think I was wrong. OR at least, at the very least, they chose from song to song, for each different guitar part. Why not? If you think about it, that sounds (pun intended) as the most logical choice when you’re in the studio, have a bunch of gear sitting there and you know how to use it. So the point is that it is even more “difficult” – if you will – than what one may figure out from their comfortable chair at home; they used what they thought worked best.

 

'nother mikes close up

‘nother mikes close up

G12Ms just have the grit it took for this song, and the G12-65s didn’t. Period. In fact, what moved me away from the G12-65s was the fact that I simply wasn’t able to capture the fine high end treble side of the sound. Wouldn’t match, couldn’t match, I had been moving the microphones from every possible position on the cab (and even pulling them away a bit) imaginable for more than a week, seven or eight hours a day. Pulling, re-positioning, re-playing rhythm, re-listen, shake your head, re-move the microphones, etc.

 

This had been the process for me, this has been the way I did it this time. And if you want to know the truth, I enjoyed this to life. At first, when in the first two days I had started recording I realised I wasn’t pulling it right I almost fell on the verge of desperation, especially at the end of the day, in the evening. Franz knows this well, as he and I have been (we are, typically) in contact maybe 50 times a day thanks to the great WhatsApp application on our iphones. We’d be lost without it 😆 I sent him dozens of versions of my recordings of a specific guitar part (when Angus plays alone for a couple of moments) that I knew was the sound to match. Gorgeous, to die for tone. It’s that pure Marshall tone few have on tape, but AC/DC do and managed to do it several times. When you hear that sound – and Angus’ timing and chord changing, which is intimately all part of the same heavenly thing – you feel your adrenaline pump. At least I do. I still do, after listening to that part and the song for probably hundreds of times. I love them so, to this point, that it makes no difference how many times I listen to them, I still love ’em like the first time. Isn’t this what characterises this timeless huge pieces of classic rock history? Yes, it is.

 

When I realised it couldn’t be G12-65s, I pulled in another cab in the lab. For ease of transportation, I thought my 1969 (dated) original Marshall 4×12 loaded with pre-rola greenbacks and basket weave cloth might do the trick. It took me days to realise that the thick basket wave (that light brown one, the older type) was such an equaliser itself that it wouldn’t let the frequencies shine. I had to replace it with another one. At this point, I had two more non slanted 4×12 cabs, one loaded with G12H30s and one with 4 more G12Ms ” blackbacks” from the late 1970s (I only later remembered that these were probably exactly the types of G12Ms used by AC/DC from Let There Be Rock onwards). I tried both and got disgusted by the G12H30s – at least on the 2203. Went for the latter. Finally was rewarded. I’m telling you all of this just to let you know that I tested stuff; so you don’t have to, if you want. You can start from here, if you too plan of matching your sound as closely as possible to the original.

As you read, even the cloth type will make a considerable difference… so much that you may not be able to match a sound.

Lastly,  play lightly. Lightly, gently. Just barely touch the strings when strumming. The tonal difference will amaze you.

 

It’s a formula, frankly, and one that no one ever put down so meticulously before as I have and am doing; but we did, right here and now, and now you and I can use it (and abuse it) even planning on simulating it with other gear. In fact, in my not so humble opinion, only once we start from the original, authentic stuff we can then proceed to recreating or simulating such sounds in a serious way; all the other talk on the internet leaves me indifferent, and such rumour of “I sound like AC/DC with a Peavey such and such” is comical. Not because it can’t happen – maybe it can – but I just demand proof and a serious approach (scientific, if you would).

Actually, part of what pushed me (us) into this quest (the tone quest) was also the (in)famous internet talk that has been going on for years (and before it, probably word of mouth). You have people swearing that Higway To Hell was played with a JTM45 because someone told someone else that Angus Young only used JTM45s especially in the early days (…).

Dear god, please make them go away ( 😆 ). So we had people actually buying gear because some arrogant twat was having a big mouth telling foolish stories with no back up. This has got to end, and I have been doing what I do also with this purpose.

Now that I also got this out of my system (but we’ll talk about arrogance several times more, as when it comes to AC/DC many other “musicians” not aware of what it takes to play AC/DC have very large mouths), let’s proceed on with one big image (and its description) of the signal path inside protools for this track (for the rhythm part, precisely).

(please take a look at the picture to the right; open it in a new tab if necessary to see it in its entirety)

Angus Rhythm Guitar Processing within ProTools. From left to Right, Tape Delay, Helios EQ, Slate Digital Virtual Console, Ocean Way Studio Reverb, Fairchild Compressor and Tape Simulator

Angus Rhythm Guitar Processing within ProTools. From left to Right, Tape Delay, Helios EQ, Slate Digital Virtual Console, Ocean Way Studio Reverb, Fairchild Compressor and Tape Simulator

It could be scary (to look at), and most of all, one could think… “Fil how in heaven much do these plugins change/affect the sound? How much therefore stays of your original performance in tone, given the amount of plugins you are using?”. Well, here’s the confusing (and true to the bone) answer: the sound as originally recorded is the one that counts for 90%. All these other gimmicks serve me (us) only the purpose of, in my case, give some true “recording studio” depth to my otherwise “clothes closet”sound that I call laboratory.

The fascinating part about these plug ins is that more than less, they do what they claim to do: add that “depth” of true sound as captured by analog gear back in the day. The Slate Digital console for example, you can’t almost hear it’s there (and it takes a whole lot processing power of my Mac Pro with 12 cores!). If you put it on and off, we almost can’t tell the difference (but it is there). Some other plugins are definitely more obvious, such as, for example, Equalisers. Equalisers were almost always used. Now, let’s take as an example what really happened with the recording (and mixing) of Highway To Hell.

1. AC/DC went in the studio

2. microphones were placed, more or less in the same room, with baffles separating at least partially the musicians.

– For Ang and Malcolm, three microphones were used (we are using two). Each microphone then went into the console, where some initial EQ was applied, before the sounds being recorded to tape (tape machines were the only way of recording back then!).  We are UNAWARE if the microphones were added altogether and then equalised as just one signal, or equalised independently and then added together. In this exercise that I did here, I equalised the sounds of the two microphones independently, then added them on the same channel where I further processed them together. The further processing being mainly, mild compression (fairchild), reverb (Ocean Way: it simulates the sound of a real room) and tape (which adds a little more compression – slightly – and some colour). Professional recording engineers of yesteryear and today tell us that both of these methods were used at the time and today: they say, “use whatever works”.

I can assure you – because I tried! – that you either have a great starting sound or with these toys, you will get to NOTHING. Nada. It is depressing on one side – our childish side if you will – and utterly stimulating on the other side. You read above that the child in me got desperate as I started with even this more serious quest I am now into. But as the days got by, I simply realised more and more that the “artistic”, real way of doing this is just… doing it seriously, learning and trying hard. Working hard, basically, that once again has been one of the founding values of our beloved AC/DC (yes!).

3. once these initial takes were done, such tapes were brought to the mixing console, where mixes were done (in this case, by Platt/Lange). Mixing a song basically implies careful adjustment of instrument (microphone) levels, panning and the use of outboard gear – typically – such as, in fact, compressor, equalisers, reverbs, delays etc. And another tape machine – at the time – to record the final results onto.

What I am now about to underline is that two separate sets of equalisers were used, then tapes (compression) and some other compression (through compressors). So you do understand how much processing even then went down… I am really adding little to this. Matter of fact, I just added “one equalisation” step to this chain, precisely, I added the only equaliser we are told from Tony Platt himself: the one on the Helios console that he did use to mix this album. Which is exactly why I used the Helios plugins here (as well as the Fairchild compressor, that was THE compressor to be find on Helios consoles). Isn’t this tremendously fascinating?

 

 

 

(article in development)

avatar
Fil "SoloDallas" Olivieri
sd@solodallas.com

I like Geetars!

45 Comments
  • avatar
    luke_garza
    Posted at 20:34h, 23 July

    So which pickups did you use in the new HTH SERIES; Walk all over you, Shot down in flames, and Highway to hell???
    -Luke

  • avatar
    dogeatdog
    Posted at 19:48h, 02 March

    Hi Fil,
    Great work as always.
    For me HTH is where it all changed with regards to the ‘verbs and subtle delays.There’s definitely more than one might initially think.

    And the whole album really screams 57’s.The increased bite and reduced Low Mids are the classic 57 sound.Some of the guitars are definitely thinner sounding (but not in a bad way)than previous albums but i think the reduced Low Mids actually helped Bon’s vocal sit better and made the album more radio friendly sounding.It’s almost a kinda scooping technique but it sure worked.

    By the time of BIB,with Brians different vocal Eq characterisics the sound had fattened up again(certainly on the guitars) yet they still achieved a classic radio friendly EQ curve in the totality of the sound.I reckon there’s a serious amount of delay and ‘verbs on BIB but done very subtly-if that makes sense…you know what i mean..:.)

    Keep up the great work :.)

  • avatar
    Mukkezz
    Posted at 15:51h, 26 February

    Hi Fil, can you please do a tutorial about REVERB. I think this is a huge part in the AC/DC guitar tone you hear at the album. But it is often overlooked. Thanks.

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 10:56h, 27 February

      Hi Muk, yes I will. For now: keep in mind that everyone, every single sound engineer or producer that has been interviewed about the AC/DC sound and the reverb specifically, clearly stated that the more you hear the reverb in the sound, the less they like it. No “wet” feeling, especially on the rhythm tracks. That doesn’t mean AT ALL though that reverb (and /or tape delay) wasn’t there. It was in fact, especially from the times of the better productions (1977-ish onward). HOW did they do it? They used tape delay on both guitars, just VERY little, “subtle” sounding, very short repeat, almost un-percievable, but it IS there and if you pay attention especially in those parts where the guitars stop playing, you’ll hear it. It was (and still is!) put there to REINFORCE the sound, “thicken”, “fatten”. This is their words, not mine, but I’ll now use them as well, as I too found exactly the same result from using my Universal Audio Tape delay plug-in. They naturally did not use and do not use currently plug ins, but still analog audio. They do and did obtain the delay effect both with a specific tape delay unit AND the bigger tape units (slap delay). And I do suggest you experiment with one as well! As for the reverb, the most used type of reverb was the EMT140 – you’ll find tons of emulation plug ins for this: it was the first, incredibly good sounding plate reverb. It was basically a whole room (LOL) with metal panels and a control unit in the control room. Most big studios had one in the 1970s and 1980s. Also in this case, add just a tad. Sometimes, I still make the mistake of adding too much – I’ll hate myself once I posted the video! Have fun, Fil

      • avatar
        Mukkezz
        Posted at 17:29h, 27 February

        Thanks a bunch for the fast reply! Yes I hear some (tape) echo/reverb aswell. E.g. in the solo of ‘Go Down’ or in ‘If you want blood’. I find it hard to experiment with different echo sounds. I don’t care much about the specific plug-in. More about differents in sound when you use a plate or a room reverb. Or the differents between a tape echo or reverb. I find it hard to find some good demonstrations of that. Especially for Classic Rock and AC/DC sounds. I like your sound in the The Schaffer Replica series when you cover the songs SDIF and IYWB. (I can clearly hear that there is some kind of echo/reverb going on.)

  • avatar
    toreilly
    Posted at 22:47h, 22 January

    Amazing job, Fil! Sorry I’m late to the party here. You’ve been amazingly generous in sharing your discoveries…but in the even that you haven’t reached the limit of your generosity, I thought I’d push my luck and ask 2 questions.

    1. Where did you end up placing the mics relative to the dustcap of the speaker?

    2. Have you considered sharing what the basic track sounds like – before any of the EQ & tape simulator plugins, etc? I, for one, would be very interested in hearing it.

    Thanks so much!

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 11:03h, 27 February

      So sorry to reply to you only now! Clearly I’ve missed your comment and can only read it here.

      1. I always try to get a little of the dust cap and the cone. I try to get more cone than dust cap, but I know I have spent hours moving one (or two!) microphones about one millimetre a time. At least on Marshall cabinets, the minimum position change will change the sound. Good and bad at the same time!

      2. Will share the basic tracks of course, I think it will be very informative for all of us

      Thanks!

  • avatar
    AngusRudd1019
    Posted at 07:50h, 06 November

    Dear God, those plug ins are expensive…What are some good substitutes, if any Fil??Any free ones lol?

  • avatar
    Ant
    Posted at 14:27h, 31 October

    VERY interesting Fil, time to get pro-tools and make a start!

    for one to replicate a picture they must have the right pallet of colours! :)

  • avatar
    JaiminhoPagina
    Posted at 22:43h, 20 October

    This is really a very interesting “experiment” (if I may say so)

    So, basically you bough all these MD421s to get “this” particular sound. Damn Fil… With all this gear, skills and knowledge it sounds like a HUGE (X1000000 times) waste that you had to sell your studio. Seriously…. I can’t imagine how many great sounds and music could have come out of it!

    I mean…. seriously…. You could be one of the most well paid sound engineer/ music producers or whatever you want to call it.

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 22:46h, 20 October

      Andre! Well I can still be one, no? IF they call me… will do it 😉

      • avatar
        JaiminhoPagina
        Posted at 22:51h, 20 October

        If I ever become a professional musician (and I’m really aspiring to be one at the moment…. LOL) I would certainly have your name on the tip of my tongue!

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 23:00h, 20 October

          Hehe… YOU CAN be a pro musician. And make a living off of it, especially in the part of the world you are now. NOT here in Italy – here everything’s dead and eons away from rock life anyway. North and south America may be good places for that. Which is also why… we’ll be moving to the US next year 😉

          • avatar
            JaiminhoPagina
            Posted at 23:07h, 20 October

            Well, Brazil is not a good way to start to be honest. Probably have to go somewhere else if I want to do that. But well, we’ll see. :)

            Still have some time to think.

  • avatar
    Ant
    Posted at 12:03h, 20 October

    im surprised you had enough room to breath in that lab!

    Man first you steped on my face then my gut and then my balls, truly epic Fil 😉

  • avatar
    AngusRudd1019
    Posted at 09:40h, 20 October

    Soooo much Pre-Amp to get that monstrous tone. Can’t wait to see the EQ you put on it. That is what interests me the most. Fil, what do you suggest I do since I’m recording with a 100W amp? Is there any way to just deal with it without getting a attenuator? What if I pulled the mics back?

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 09:50h, 20 October

      Yep. AND – something I haven’t written down in the review yet – the guitar tone control MUST be on 5. Not 4 or 6, 5. I completely hate to have to say that the settings make a difference, but for recording purposes, they do. To get a specific sound RECORDED the closest possible, settings make a difference. So you MUST have the master set around 4 and the preamp higher (I put it on 8, it could be maybe on 7 too, but not lower – won’t work). So you have to remember that in order to get the sound recorded in a given way, the SOURCE must sound like it (close to it naturally, post processing DOES make a difference!) and as much as possible, too. So now put your master on 4, pre amp on 8, all the controls more or less in the middle, guitar volume on 10 and tone on 5 and try even without recording yourself. Or just record yourself with your phone. What THEY used to do with loud amps in the studios: putting them against the walls and corners, then baffling them on the sides. You are likely going to be arrested without an attenuator of sorts… and it’s going to take you a while with takes before you can pull it played right. Was the same for them. So your family & neighbours are going to know exactly what notes you nail and which ones you don’t. Careful! Please consider seriously an attenuation of sorts. Microphones: THEY CAN be put afar, but with an SM57 it won’t matter much, they DO withstand the power of 100 watts as MD421s, which is the reason they were used back then to begin with!

      • avatar
        AngusRudd1019
        Posted at 22:00h, 20 October

        I’m lucky, I live in an acre and 1/2 of land and have my own studio with sound reducing foam so I get no complaints on volume. My nearest neighbors are 2 acres away, and the 100W works great in my AC/DC Tribute Band. I just haven’t had any reason to get an attenuator.

        • avatar
          AngusRudd1019
          Posted at 22:03h, 20 October

          I’m going to try and turn my amp towards the wall…I need to get an MD421

          • avatar
            SoloDallas
            Posted at 22:13h, 20 October

            OKAY, wait – NO need to get the MD421 yet. Let’s work this out together. Turn the cab against the corner first – yep – and add baffles if you can (i.e., let’s try to enclose the cab the best way). Mic positioning will be slightly harder to accomplish (difficult access, you’ll see) but still, doable. I would put the head somewhere else, so you can cross over the cab yourself leaning on it and move the mic accordingly each time you’re trying a different position. The MAIN sound of Highway to hell is… SM57s! The MD421 was added for the body of the sound, likely bass and LMF. I believe the rest was SM57 and what you hear as characterising the sound the most is the SM57. So hang on before you spend your money of the MD421 (like me lol).
            Let’s hear your results with the SM57 first. BRUSH the strings, DO NOT hit hard – watch me do it, I spent hours to get it right. Seems like I’m hitting hard but am not; just a determined movement – this yes, for the timing – but BRUSH the strings lightly.

            • avatar
              Dries
              Posted at 22:38h, 20 October

              I think you’re right. But don’t forget some instrument (guitar) parts were fed trough monitors and remiced, during the mixing process. On some songs I can really hear this, not on all. Highway to hell the song itself for example seems to be a “dry” recording (with a bit postp. reverb ). Here are Tony’s words;

              “I didn’t actually record H to H – it was done in Roundhouse Studios which was very dead so there was no spill between the instruments. As a result when I came to mix it I needed to create the impression of the room and fed drums and guitars through speakers into Studio 2 at Basing Street”

              • avatar
                Dries
                Posted at 22:39h, 20 October

                another citation; “I used some Altec monitors to feed stuff back into the studio and create more ambience”

              • avatar
                SoloDallas
                Posted at 22:45h, 20 October

                Oh yes of course! I kept that very much in mind. The sound that we hear on Mal’s side of Ang’s guitar on this track (for example) it’s just THAT – not at all real spillover, which wasn’t there originally. It’s really Platt’s trick! Funny, and it worked (obviously, genius… )

                • avatar
                  Dries
                  Posted at 22:47h, 20 October

                  You think it is ? Damn, really thought they were two different close mics. One has remarkably less grit and fizz than the other one. You could be right..Need to tune my ears 😉

                  • avatar
                    SoloDallas
                    Posted at 22:53h, 20 October

                    I don’t think we would have found out by ear if he didn’t mention that himself… I thought it was spillover until I read the article years ago 😆

                  • avatar
                    SoloDallas
                    Posted at 22:57h, 20 October

                    The less grit and fizz is the MD421. Very flat sounding mike, almost disappointing on overdriven guitar. I don’t think it can or should be used alone for it, it always got shoved in there with the SM57. And mind you, we’re not talking about the current SM57 production, but the older, USA made ones. And they WERE different. The current ones are harsher. Fizzy. The older ones, also known as Unidyne III models sounded way better, and they are the ones (much likely) used on the album. The current ones were made later, in Mexico. So much that I do have on order one Unidyne, but didn’t make it for this video (will maybe make it to the next one). Not expensive.

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 22:08h, 20 October

          GREAT!

  • avatar
    KyleSG
    Posted at 22:32h, 19 October

    I will say 100%….you can’t get any closer what so ever unless you were back in 1979 in the studio with them. Awesome Job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • avatar
    Angusrocks
    Posted at 12:59h, 19 October

    Interesting…no G12-65 and instead of these G12Ms ?? Mmmhhh…i have both in my box…two and two 😉

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 13:03h, 19 October

      Best way to go, especially with the “right” cabinet cloth for this application: either the checkered one or the black type. They both let the sound out pretty well, still providing “some equization”

  • avatar
    go down
    Posted at 09:49h, 19 October

    Hey Fil,
    Just finished watching WAOY , STUNNING !!Now that the SVDS is iminent. Angus can now have his sound back for the next AC/DC album, for the first time since flicking the switch(and his original Shaffer wireless).
    Sean
    Australia

  • avatar
    Johnny
    Posted at 14:25h, 18 October

    seen this on youtube last night fil and was blown away!!! Amazing job on this one :)

  • avatar
    Johnny Free
    Posted at 10:38h, 18 October

    Absolutely nailed a really unique and tough tone to get. Especially when you turn the TSR on for the solo, the sound is monstrous. The marshall itself sounds the part too (well, actually it IS the part here!). Thank you for sharing all these great tone adventures of yours. There are lots of guys doing such things locked in a studio somewhere, not willing to give away the knowledge they’ve aquired. But we are all very lucky to be here, with a guy who loves to share just as much he loves to discover! Cheers Fil! :)

  • avatar
    AngusRudd1019
    Posted at 09:33h, 18 October

    That blows my mind!!! So HTH was not recorded with Neumann’s!?!?!? Holy Ravioli!!! I only have 1 SM57 as of right now. I will post my results on here once I get the vocal track done from a friend of mine. Anyways, I have come to learn that just 1 SM57 doesn’t pick up enough. Doesn’t get a full sound, something is missing.

    Which mics did you use in this video/recording? What kind of EQ did you use and mic placement? I have a bunch of new equipment to use that my dad got and I am using away at it and trying to figure it all out and man, Fil, it’s a totally different field. Recording is a whole other universe in the music business…You know that already though. EQing is so important with mic placement. Cheers as always Fil.

    Corey B.

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 10:12h, 18 October

      Corey, be patient. Article being developed…I will uncover each detail of this, including my own images of mic placement. Post EQ settings, everything. This is my current approach (matches the past :lol:) I share EVERYTHING I do.

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 10:48h, 19 October

      Corey, images coming now. Will keep on posting and updating for a few days telling the whole story (not that it should interest) of how I tried this. It took me over a month of daily trial and error :)

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