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How it all started: The history of the SVDS

04 May How it all started: The history of the SVDS

Dear members,

Over the past few weeks lots of questions regarding old Cetec-Vega devices and technical details of the original Schaffer-Vega Diversity System (SVDS) came up. We got mails, people asking and discussing in the comments, so we were able to contact Mr. Schaffer himself to ask if he would be so kind as to fill-in pieces about the technology and of the history we didn’t already know – basically, “How did this all happen?” which leads to more questions and discussions of course – and he was agreeable.

So, get ready for a nice dose of Rock history!

For the impatient reader, I’ll sum up the key facts first. For the rest of the people, have a nice reading of more detail, and Mr. Schaffer’s comments below the key facts, which are really worth reading:

Key Facts

 

  • Cetec-Vega devices were not intended or tailored for use with a guitar. Vega specialized in building wireless microphone gear for “relatively” non-demanding, low decibel, applications. SVDS was the first system to be designed, tested and built specifically for guitars.
  • While the known 50kOhm (or 100kOhm) mod is known to match the input impedance of a Cetec transmitter with the impedance of a guitar, it does nothing else… there are other, even more substantial, differences between the Cetec and the SVDS X10. Even with the mod, no Cetec unit sounds like an SVDS.

The SVDS 63EX receiver was based on a Cetec Vega 63 Model, with refinements as follows:

  • A guitar produces signals that are much more demanding than a microphone’s: complex waveforms with fast attacks, lots of notes simultaneously and strong harmonics – and you play it loud! Microphones are “easy,” the human voice smooth as silk. But to accommodate a guitar bound for 100+ dB amplification, both the transmitter and the receiver must break new ground and process signals very differently.
  • Of the major differences between the SVDS and standard Cetec systems, companding is of course the most obvious. In order to gain the full advantage of companding, other factors need be addressed in designing the transmitter, such as pre-processing the signal even before feeding it to the (transmitter’s) compressor. Pre-emphasis (in the transmitter) and de-emphasis (in the receiver), and their associated time constants have to be carefully calibrated in order for the receiver’s expander to accurately track the transmitter’s compressor.
  • Several 1980-era Cetec devices are labeled with “Dynex”, which stands for “Dynamic Expansion.” Mr. Schaffer did not have anything to do with Cetec’s “Dynex” technology; it was introduced after Mr. Schaffer moved on to pursue other interests (1980).
  • Maybe (we don’t know it) “Dynex” is based on Mr. Schaffer’s work though. (Cetec was not allowed to use Mr. Schaffer’s invention for its own devices during the time 5 years he was active with SVDS.)

Ok, those were the key facts so far. Now some historical information about how it came about:

 

The story of the SVDS

1. As an idea, the The SVDS was born while Mr. Schaffer was out (“doing odd jobs”) on the Rolling Stones’ 1975 “Tour of the Americas.” He explains: “The ’75 tour marked the first time promoters sold tickets behind the stage, which sort of obligated Mick to grab a wireless hand mike a few times each night to go ’round back and show some leg. And almost every night, there was trouble – some of it was hilarious: the mic would crap out – RF fades one night… interference from taxi dispatchers, doormen and police calls the next. At its best, limited dynamic range made it sound terrible compared to a corded mic. Seeing that was my inspiration, what got me off to find solutions.”

“A wireless mic is just a radio…” Mr. Schaffer had been building radios since he was a teen-aged ham operator (“call letters” N2KS), had a hand in building a couple of New York’s studios and felt sure that he could make a better radio. Once off-tour, he began fiddling with one of the band’s wireless systems.

2. In 1975, Vega’s Model 58 receiver, mated to their Model 77 lavalier transmitter or various Shure hand mics, was nearly an industry-standard in the relatively low-amplitude applications of the day: film production, broadcast, summer theater, preachers. The 58 itself was simply a well-made radio receiver – nothing fancy –  a non-companded single ended receiver that, like the 77 transmitter, had minimal signal processing – well-made, but with specs that fell well short of what was needed to deliver the signal from a guitar accurately and reliably. Amongst then-current wireless manufacturers, the Vega division of Cetec Corporation distinguished itself, to Mr. Schaffer’s eye, by going “the extra mile” to stabilize the frequency tolerances of its transmitters and receivers through crystal control using expensive helical resonator cavity filters on the receiver’s front-end to fight interference, As Mr. Schaffer accounts, “They “made” (as in “construct”) good stuff – why I chose them to manufacture.”

Mr. Schaffer, at first, started applying various tweaks and new ideas, especially companding, to the “usual” hand mic.  Early into it he switched tracks and had the idea to build something that never existed: a system specifically for guitar.   That proved to be far more demanding. After developing prototypes, Mr. Schaffer struck a deal with Vega to manufacture his system, the first companded wireless system of any kind, as well as the first system designed specifically for guitar.

3. The Vega 77 transmitter didn’t feature companding – it actually used a limiter to clip the tops off signal peaks. The X10’s audio front-end, time constants and pre-emphasis pre-processed for guitar, optimized its signal to be passed into a fixed 2:1 compressor for transmission to a fixed 1:2 expander, and its associated processing, in the receiver. This was “companding,” introduced for the first time.  The transmitter’s 2:1 compression squeezed together the highest and lowest amplitudes of the guitar’s signal so that the whole signal could fit inside the narrow range that lay above the noise floor and below overloading. Transmitted to the other side of the circuit, the 63EX receiver expanded it back – 1:2, like a mirror. Careful signal processing ensured that the 63EX’s expander tracked the X10’s compressor accurately so there was no “breathing.” The companded SVDS delivered a dynamic range of about 100 dB.

The SVDS paired 2 major components: the X10 transmitter and the 63EX receiver. The X10/63EX combination became a system that overcame the audio limitations of previous wireless systems which could, at best, transmit a S/N ratio and dynamic range way too low for rock n’ roll guitar. The theoretical limit of dynamic range at the 5 KHz maximum FM transmitter deviation permitted by the US Federal Communications Commission was less than 70 dB.

4. Mr. Schaffer: “Noise gates are what I tried, at first, to kill the hiss in between notes… that just didn’t work. You’d hear a whole lot of loud pumping and breathing. It sounded like emphysema or maybe a full-blown asthma attack. But I knew a different technology: companders – Dolby & dbx –  were already coming into studios – they were companders… and the technique made it possible to store 100 dB of signal on a 65 dB-limited medium: tape. It was magic. So I figured companding would do the same for another limited medium: radio. It did. It worked.”  Companding “tricked” the RF section into delivering close to 100 dB with that same 5 KHz space.

5. SVDS also employed an RF technique known as “diversity reception” to eliminate signal fades – this called for two completely separate receivers packaged together with a comparator that, most simply, silently switched from one receiver to the other when a signal-strength threshold was crossed. This was the SVDS 63EX receiver. The diversity technique eliminated the fades that plagued previous systems.

(Neither Vega nor Mr. Schaffer invented the diversity technique – that was done by a guy with a funny name who, in the 1920’s,  ran the US Army’s main trans-Atlantic shortwave station.  Signal fades were a severe problem on shortwave…  he discovered that he could eliminate them by using 2 antennas spaced at least a wavelength apart… each saw a different world. (Imagine he sat there monitoring signals from both antennas and throwing a big jackknife switch to pick between them at the first signs of a fade.)

6. For convenience and economy, Mr. Schaffer used the same casing as used by Vega’s transmitters and receivers for the X10/63EX. (Though the Vega housing was beige; the 63EX’s was black.)

Please mind the “63” vs. “63EX” models were completely different units!

 

pro63_front-smalle18g6669Looking similar, working different: A Vega Pro63 with Dynex and the SVDS.

 

 

Some notes of interest regarding our favorite inventor:

 

7. Once Mr. Schaffer had manufactured prototypes in hand he took advantage of his luck – to be living in New York and plugged into just about everyone in music. Until word of mouth took off, he’d demo his stuff by loading units into an Anvil case and showing up at almost any gig, a studio or rehearsal stage. It only took a couple of years until most major bands were using one or more SVDS units.

The SVDS was about $4,100; too expensive for any but arena bands. Mr. Schaffer: “I wasn’t keen on making the compromises in design and construction it would take to get it cheap enough to be a real “consumer” model. Anyway, I wasn’t so interested in “commerce.” And I was itching with ideas to develop other stuff.”

8. “I really don’t know much about Vega’s DYNEX systems — we never used that term – it certainly came along after I’d moved on.” Of course, the acronym infers that the systems featured a compander. By the time Vega introduced its Dynex model, companding radios was generic, kind of public domain; SVDS raised the bar, and by the late 70s, companded systems had been introduced by, and were available from, several manufacturers. Mr. Schaffer never bothered to patent it or anything else. “During the years we were building SVDS, Vega couldn’t compete with us. But they weren’t music guys, anyway: even after we’d sold a few hundred units, even after we’d moved off and on, Vega still hadn’t a guitar or amplifier or someone to play it for test. You’d think…”


By 1980/81, Mr. Schaffer became obsessed with satellites and focused away from wireless. He left the music business and went looking for oddball TV in space. In 1984 he developed – of all things – an unusual satellite receiving system that could to tune in to Soviet TV. WTF Kenneth!  Mr. Schaffer’s unique system was used by US government agencies and universities to spy on the Soviet Union. He insisted that all the 6 metre satellite dishes be red. (“You wanna eavesdrop on Russia… it’s gonna be RED!”)  He came back to music briefly after becoming riveted by the changes he saw (on TV) going on in Gorbachev’s Russia, and in 1988 he brought Boris Grebenshikov, often described as the Bob Dylan-cum-John Lennon of the Soviet Union, to the US and UK to record an album, “Radio Silence,” for CBS, produced by Dave Stewart.  In 1991, Mr. Schaffer started a company, BelCom, that became the biggest satellite communications provider to Western companies operating in the former Soviet Union. In 2003, he invented a technology that came to be known as “placeshifting” with a system called TV2Me.

Come 35 years after introducing SVDS…  we find Mr. Schaffer still listening to Hendrix, and having 4 mismatched SVDS pairs in his front room closet – as souvenirs.

“Out of nowhere, comes this amazing letter from an irresistibly engaging guy in Rome… he had clearly done his homework — he really, really wanted any old units I could find and to know EVERYTHING about SVDS – particularly, as I understood it, as key to solving the mystery of Angus Young’s guitar sound on “Back in Black.”  Crazy obsession, ask me…. but his care and devotion to it was compelling… “

“… before long I was packing up all my vintage souvenirs for a flight to a deserving home Rome.” 


Let’s end  this article with a nice image:

 

The SVDS in the news: Performance Magazine, Billboard Magazine, Rolling Stone Magazine

Now, dear members, any more questions? Please tell us in the comments then. Big thanks to Mr. Schaffer for being open and  taking time to give us insight into the world of 70s and 80s Rock. We really feel honored.

avatar
Franz Farklas
banane@exception.at

I'm born 1970, a big AC/DC fan since 1982, when I got the "Back in Black" cassette tape together with a little cassette player from my grandpa. Fully classic rock addicted, don't like "modern" music styles like HipHop. 2009 I got a Gibson SG standard ebony, learning to play AC/DC songs from tabs and videos since then. Beside that, I'm a totally computer addicted guy and Linux Server specialist. Working as internet server and network admin and part-time IT consultant. So, when I'm not behind my guitar, I'm behind the keyboard :-) Feel free to contact me at ICQ 71095781 or MSN banane@exception.at or skype ffarklas@exception.at.

56 Comments
  • avatar
    OldSchoolRocker666
    Posted at 19:50h, 27 June

    Lets say someone suddenly gets a ”brilliant”(?) idea of using two boost pedals used in the same time when playing, as if one wasen’t enough for this potentional guitar player, what happens if two boost pedals are used in the same time? Do it really work? Is there any risk of damaging the amp? Do it give a ”twice as big boost” since there are two in the guitar chain?

    Anyone ever tried or heard about this trick?

    • avatar
      Angusrocks101
      Posted at 22:40h, 27 June

      I have done it before. I’ve boosted my bad monkey overdrive with a clean boost pedal and the NMV amp running at 7 and with bad monkey on being about BIB gain levels the clean boost took it into GNR AFD territory. It sounds great and I wouldn’t think it would damage your amp bc it wouldn’t be any more boost than like a heavy metal distortion pedal if you know what I mean. And the double boost if that’s what you would call it sounds better than metal distortion. But I’m not really a metal tone fan.

  • avatar
    saxosim
    Posted at 23:10h, 14 May

    I have been looking at a Vega Pro 58 to buy from the USA and am fairly tempted to order it. I will also look to buy the replica SVDS when released. I just wondered before I decide for sure if anyone knows any issues with using the the Vega Pro 58 on wireless in Europe and more specifically in the Uk. It is on frequency 181.800, I have looked on Google but can’t really find much information on this frequency and any potential legalality radio frequency issues. I am not savvy on the radio electronics side of things so if anyone can advise that would be great, thanks :-)

    • avatar
      banane
      Posted at 23:20h, 14 May

      Currently, only frequencies between 800 Mhz and 1000 Mhz are allowed for Wireless Audio usage in Europe, as far as I know. Basically, it depends on your environment if there will be problems or not. Playing it in the basement may work without getting you in trouble. Often its fine, sometimes its not.
      Also, you should consider that the Pro63 is NOT a SVDS.

      • avatar
        saxosim
        Posted at 23:29h, 14 May

        Thanks I feared it was a bit of a grey area nowadays I will play it safe and just give the Pro 58 I saw a miss and just wait for the replica SVDS. Thanks i knew they were different I just fancied trying one out with it being vintage. I read it could be tweaked to add a jack to play guitar through it, just curious about the sound, thanks again cheers :-)

        • avatar
          SCgrad98
          Posted at 06:53h, 15 May

          If you ask Dries about how the Pro 58 sounds, I think he would agree that it sounds amazing! For a fraction of the cost, it’s definitely worth owning.

          • avatar
            Dries
            Posted at 07:22h, 15 May

            Yes, but it really needs someone with knowledge looking at it to tune it. The hiss is killing… TX trim pot for compression doesn’t get higher than 3-4/10 for me. Otherwise the notes are really highly compressed, good sustain though 😉

            • avatar
              banane
              Posted at 07:33h, 15 May

              Yes, that’s one of the differences to the SVDS. The Pro63 use a limiter instead of a compander.

              With the SVDS, you can crank the transmitter all the way up and get an awesome, slightly compressed (but not overcompressed), and very harmonic tone. When I tried it for the first time, it was really a “fuck yeah” experience :)

    • avatar
      Dries
      Posted at 23:23h, 14 May

      Frequenties from 100 – 300 etc were for police, army, companies, fire dep., etc. But now all those went digital a while ago, so mostly there is no more broadcasting on these frequenties;

      • avatar
        banane
        Posted at 23:27h, 14 May

        Yes, right. Problem is, they may still use these frequencies, and if they do and someone enjoys them with some AC/DC playing, it may mean some troubles then :) I won’t rely on that they all switched to digital.

        • avatar
          saxosim
          Posted at 23:32h, 14 May

          Yes I totally agree banane, you never know what is switched off and what may be active, I will play it safe and not bother buying the old pro 58 cheers all for the input :-)

  • avatar
    Dries
    Posted at 21:30h, 12 May

    Wow. Received my Vega’s pro 58 couple days ago. Last 2 days non stop testing and tweaking the wireless circuit… Absolute no loud hiss anymore, and after the 50k input resistor change, man what a sound and drive!

    Really decent wireless devices.! Now waiting for the SVDS replica to do an A/B test 😉

    http://i47.tinypic.com/xatcu0.jpg

    • avatar
      banane
      Posted at 22:48h, 12 May

      Looks awesome, Dries. Congrats! :)
      The replica will have much more boost. About twice as much. On Guido’s Prototype, about 50% output volume equates to SVDS on 100% output.

      And while I’m already writing a comment, the PCBs (circuit boards) for the very first pre-production prototypes (means: sample prototypes we will test again before giving green lights for serial production) will be made this week!

      • avatar
        Dries
        Posted at 22:55h, 12 May

        That will be a huge amount of boost! With the monitor halfway, my preamp level is at 4-5, for really high boost.

        Also found a trim pot inside the TX, that boosts the transmit signal, unlike the outside trim pot for the compression, about half way this one.
        With the little trim pot inside the TX you can really get a huge signal boost, but the hiss noise remains the same! Double win 😉

        • avatar
          banane
          Posted at 23:08h, 12 May

          Yes, true. The 2203/2204 doesn’t need that much boost. But with a 1959/1987 you get a really huge and very raw sound.

    • avatar
      gallanman
      Posted at 22:53h, 12 May

      I do exactly the same thing with Vega Pro 63.
      One of my transmitter is similar to TX10 Vega: it’s a Vega 77c.
      After changing into 100k, it sounds terribly well!
      Although my marshall is a jtm45 changed, the Cetec doing a very good job.
      As you say: “Now waiting for the replica to do SVDS year A / B test”

      • avatar
        Dries
        Posted at 23:01h, 12 May

        But the 77 TX are quite a bit diffrent than the TX10. I see more IC’s on the TX10, probably the very different compander components.

        On the input of the Tx 77 , the signal first goes trough a capacitor, and just after this capacitor, is the input resistor. Needed to remove this one, it was around 12kohm. So just put a resistor across the 1-4 LEMO pins doesn’t work on the 58’s and 63 too I think. The sound indeed get’s very ‘bassy’ on volume 7-10 with the low input impedance.

        • avatar
          banane
          Posted at 23:10h, 12 May

          Yes, the T77 and the TX10 are indeed different. Also, there are several revisions od the T77, I have about 3 different ones here.

          • avatar
            gallanman
            Posted at 23:28h, 12 May

            I’ve got a different layout of this transmitter, I think it’s an older version of the 77 transmitter.
            As I can say, the circuitly is so similar of the TX.
            For wiring, I helped myself to that of TX10.
            To show you, I attached two pictures of my transmitter:
            [IMG]http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/1571/p1100044a.jpg[/IMG]
            [IMG]http://img848.imageshack.us/img848/9545/p1100043e.jpg[/IMG]
            I know that the work is not clean, I wait a potentiometer.
            I will not say the value of the potentiometer XD

            • avatar
              banane
              Posted at 23:43h, 12 May

              Well, the T77 and the X10 were actually manufactured at the same time. Cetec continued to manufacture their own microphone transmitters (with T77) while they manufacture the the SVDS (with X10) too. So, the T77 is not an older X10 or vice versa. Just looking at the components won’t tell much.

            • avatar
              Dries
              Posted at 11:11h, 13 May

              You see the little yellow trim pot ? Try turning it while playing the wireless. You can get a huge boost from it.

              I also see you haven’t turned the variable capacitors yet. If you fine tune these also while playing ( the upper two from three in a row, be aware, very sensitive ! ) you can get a very better signal to noise ratio, at some point almost no hiss.

              • avatar
                gallanman
                Posted at 12:04h, 13 May

                Thank you for the tips 😉
                While this may interest you, I replaced one of my transmitter, the potentiometer must be adjusted with a screwdriver by a 20K ohm: although it improves the boost and it can be controlled more easily.
                The problem is that the little yellow trim pot must be removed, so if this is the one you told me, there are ways to substitute a fixed resistor.
                Potentiometer that I installed has just enough space between the little yellow trim pot and cover.
                As soon as I get the pot, I will try to make a recording.
                A pleasure to talk technical with you 😉

                • avatar
                  Dries
                  Posted at 12:30h, 13 May

                  Why must the yellow trim pot be removed?

                • avatar
                  gallanman
                  Posted at 12:30h, 13 May

                  The little yellow trim pot that I spoke (I was wrong but I found the one you told me) is actually the battery indicator 😉
                  Otherwise the setting you advised me greatly refine the transmitter!
                  Thank you!

                  • avatar
                    Dries
                    Posted at 12:33h, 13 May

                    Aha lol. Yes, this tiny pot can give a boost, an the signal to noise ratio gets fairly better; What I don’t figured out yet is of this pot adds it’s own distortion when it’s set to high, like TX overdrive, which is actually not so good…

                    But the units clear very good up when the volume is rolled of, better than the amp itsself!

                    • avatar
                      gallanman
                      Posted at 12:46h, 13 May

                      Yep!!
                      My jtm45 has more boost, very good sound like Bon Scott era.
                      If you look closely at the photos of the TX10, the little yellow trim pot seems to be set high enough, we must be on the right road.

                    • avatar
                      Dries
                      Posted at 11:36h, 22 May

                      Hey gallanman, Can I contact you in some way? Need to ask something.

                      Dries

                    • avatar
                      gallanman
                      Posted at 12:03h, 22 May

                      Yes no problem 😉
                      My email address: gallanman@gmail.com

                    • avatar
                      rockn roll man
                      Posted at 07:45h, 27 June

                      My input inpedance is 91 on my vega pro 58. Is it good?

                    • avatar
                      dash8311
                      Posted at 17:50h, 27 June

                      yes that is ideal

  • avatar
    Ant
    Posted at 03:02h, 06 May

    Wonderful, such an achivement this device and the genius (Mr S) behind it 😉 its a shame it faded away back then but it has returned for a second coming which just goes to show how brilliant it realy is!

  • avatar
    gallanman
    Posted at 10:42h, 05 May

    A very good article that you have published Fil!!
    Thank you very much!!

    I would like to express my idea:
    On ebay, I won a set of 8 Cetec Vega Model 63 with their transmitter. 5 Operates very well!
    Of the five units, I would like to be a replica of SVDS.
    I think I can do because I have changed my marshall jtm45.
    I like to change, create devices for something unique.
    Although I will have a lot of time and check with a technician, I am ready to try.

    Especially do not consider my idea as an insult to the work of the replica, on the contrary, when the sale is made, I bought a replica!!
    I respect the work of the replica as well as those actively involved for us to share a device that has marked the rock and roll!!

    If you agree, I’m interested in the schemas of transmitter and receiver.
    Thank you in advance!

    • avatar
      banane
      Posted at 11:13h, 05 May

      Sorry mate, but after we put that much time, money and effort into all this, we can’t give anything out.

      • avatar
        gallanman
        Posted at 11:20h, 05 May

        I totally understand, there is no problem;)

        • avatar
          banane
          Posted at 11:21h, 05 May

          Great mate, thanks! :)

          • avatar
            gallanman
            Posted at 11:31h, 05 May

            I have a question:
            Where can I find antenna?
            After I do not bother you more 😉

            • avatar
              banane
              Posted at 11:38h, 05 May

              I would look at radio shops for matching antennas. Or get another one with antennas on Ebay :)

              • avatar
                gallanman
                Posted at 11:56h, 05 May

                Than you so much Mr Franz!!

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 11:37h, 05 May

      Hi mate,
      unfortunately as Herr Franz just stated, can’t give out the schematics right now. For several reasons though! Not only because right now (after all this time, work and money) we have real gotten involved in this, but also because, schematics alone won’t do much. Surprise, heh? Components will also be key in this, and many won’t be easy to source. As to say, this thing is really more complicated than one might think, and this isn’t actually so surprising, if you think that it does still sound wonderfully, it’s been adopted by the REAL rock stars of that time etc. Really a unique item! :)

      • avatar
        gallanman
        Posted at 11:51h, 05 May

        Thank you for your answer;)
        I totally understand the reasons why not to give patterns.
        As I explained, once it comes out, I buy a replica because it’s still with you we can discuss Cetec and SVDS.
        You would tell me that nothing prevents me from using the replica as effects pedal and Cetec and I will opt for this option.
        Anyway, you and Mr Franz thread, thank you for your response that make me a pleasure to read, but unfortunately there is the language barrier that is that sometimes I do not quite understand.

        • avatar
          banane
          Posted at 11:57h, 05 May

          Of course you can use the replica as effects pedal and the Cetec as wireless. But I won’t do it. For a simple reason: They work in radio frequencies which are now used for television and radio broadcasting, for police and fire rescue and for general government radio communication.
          Using the same frequencies can bring you in trouble, so better check your local radio frequency standards before using them.

          I would prefer a neutral sounding modern (even a digital) wireless for playing. More easy to handle and legal.

          • avatar
            gallanman
            Posted at 12:09h, 05 May

            Thank you Mr Franz!
            I knew there were such problems in the U.S.. I’m in France, I’m going to ask a technician. In my village, I have not had a problem, though I warned my neighbors. Even in my house, I have no interferrence on TV or online.

            • avatar
              banane
              Posted at 12:16h, 05 May

              Yes, it depends where you live (in a city or in the country) and generally which frequencies are used there. The US were actually the last country who forbid the private usage of this frequencies. In Europe they are already forbidden for private use for a much longer time.
              For example, here a water treatment plant has reserved several frequencies in the 185 Mhz range for internal use. Your township government should have related information.

              • avatar
                gallanman
                Posted at 12:31h, 05 May

                Whenever I can, I’ll soon find out for the frequencies used. My village is very small, and it should not be used frequencies.
                Thank you for all that information Mr Franz and I think your answer will be helpful to other mates who have Cetec.

  • avatar
    dash8311
    Posted at 04:33h, 05 May

    Excellent write-up Franz!

    Both you and Fil’s passion come through in your posts and comments; it’s very inspiring.

    Back to playing. My new JMP1H 1 watt came yesterday: Fil, it sounds amazing, even for 1 watt, even through a 4×12 G12-65s… my Pro 58 sounds great, a replica even better I would presume :-)

    All the best!

    • avatar
      banane
      Posted at 10:01h, 05 May

      Thanks, mate! It’s really awesome to be part of that all.
      Could you post a recording of the JMP1 through the G12-65 cab in the member videos section? Would be cool to hear it.
      All the best!

    • avatar
      Dries
      Posted at 16:09h, 05 May

      Nice! How does the pro 58 sounds for guitar? Is the transmitter also ‘unmatched’?

      • avatar
        dash8311
        Posted at 17:59h, 05 May

        As Fil says, it sounds fairly close, but not exactly the SVDS sound. It’s still missing…something. Which is the different between the two, as many here know. The 100 ohm mod has completed on my transmitter as well. I use a Boss Noise Supression after the receiver and before the amp to cut out all hiss. Works fantastic and no tone loss at all. 

        Dries, what do you mean by matched? I bought three receivers and two transmitters, swapping the crystals to make two working models. 

        Not exactly the SVDS tone, but certainly a step in the right direction.

        I’ll think about a video of the JMP1… Not sure if I’m ready for my SoloDallas debut :-)

        Kris

        • avatar
          Dries
          Posted at 19:25h, 05 May

          Sorry, wasn’t exact, I meant the guitar input impedance matching 😉

          Also bought three pro 58 matched units, not received them yet. Don’t know what to expect… Exciting 😉

  • avatar
    currentpeak
    Posted at 20:59h, 04 May

    Fantastic stuff!

    It’s unbelievable what this guy achieved! Mr. Schaffer’s got my admiration.

  • avatar
    rjofig
    Posted at 14:14h, 04 May

    Great article, thanks for sharing Fil!
    I did not know the reason behind “diversity” in the name, was always curious about it, now it’s clear. Dealing with all the environment constraints and kept the same form factor, what a clever design!
    I wonder if Mr. Schaffer has studied what noticeable changes in the signal come about after the compression/expansion – the “envelope” of changes in amplitude/frequency that gives the device its “color”.
    Cheers!
    Renato

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 14:36h, 04 May

      Don’t thank me. Thank yourself (and yes, the “rest” of the team: us all). Baci, Fil :)

  • avatar
    SoloDallas
    Posted at 12:36h, 04 May

    Now, when I told you that Mr. Franz (Banane) would be in charge of all of this – Franz is now a Partner (YES!) of SoloDallas.com – I wasn’t kidding.
    Franz has been with “us” since the very first day. After sometime, we became close friends and we started working “four hands” daily, for all of this time. I can now easily say that Franz is one of my best friends. Thank you, Franz. Lots of love and respect for you.
    THEN came one of my heroes, which is undeniably, Mr. Ken Schaffer. Mr. Schaffer IS (he refuses to acknowledge this from me) one of my heroes, probably as much as Angus Young is to me. I told him several times right from the beginning, when we first got in touch. Why? Because. If you didn’t realize this yet, you should study solodallas.com more! (laughs). The reason is, shortly, that Mr. Schaffer has lived several lives packed into one. And his “adventures” aren’t even close to being over yet. Love you, Mr. Schaffer.
    Final note: not even in my dreams I would have thought this – all of this information and connections, friends etc. – could come true. Thank you SoloDallas.com Friends :)

    • avatar
      banane
      Posted at 13:17h, 04 May

      Very touching comment, Fil. Thanks for your trust in the beginning and lots of love and respect for you too :)
      Indeed, looks like this is going to be a new adventure for us all :)

    • avatar
      Ant
      Posted at 04:09h, 06 May

      I love this place you and franz have created, i dont know what i would do with out it!!!

      Seriously this place is the best!
      Group hug! :)

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