Boston’s “Party” SoloDallas Cover

17 Mar Boston’s “Party” SoloDallas Cover

I love Boston. But right now I’m running, no time to talk.

And believe me, we have a lot to talk about Boston, Marshall tone and the like.

Please watch this for now; I’ll be back later and introduce you to a great researcher, he’s done what I did for AC/DC with Boston.

His name on our SoloDallas.com is “RockmanCentral“, and he literally uncovered all the known information, secrets, methods and gear to get “that” Boston “tone”.

Over the years, I remember going to his site to learn.

On this cover, I used a little “gadget” that I have been owning for maybe 15-20 years: a “Rockman“. It was given to me by my Italian-Canadian friend “Max” (Max, are you reading? Was finally able to put your Rockman to work, after all these years!). The “Rockman” is a product of Mr. Tom Scholtz himself, but I will let RockmanCentral talk to you about it when he is ready to.

I went straight into the Rockman with all guitars (clean and driven) and then, output the Rockman into the Wizard Modern Classic, with settings presence 0, bass 0, miss 0 (!), treble 6, master 4 and pre 2.

Really in clean mode, as the big part here had to be the Rockman’s.

Recorded with a SM57 and U87.

The EQ Plugins I used on this one were Neve 1081 modules, a classic in rock music.

 

Below: a Rockman Unit similar to the one used in this video.

 

Update, courtesy of our RockmanCenter.com Friend, we now can post this superb image of Mr. Tom Scholtz who appears to be in the studio probably recording (right mouse “open in a new window” to enlarge it).

 

Several things are worth a mention (as superb gear of that time and all times in recording history): A 1176 Urei Compressor, a DBX Compressor, two tape machines, several of his own Rockman units,  a Conn Strobe Guitar tuner (just like AC/DC’s, as seen in movie Let There Be Rock) and several others. Superb. Thank you Bob!

 

 

avatar
Fil "SoloDallas" Olivieri
sd@solodallas.com

I like Geetars!

71 Comments
  • avatar
    MrNachoplaza
    Posted at 18:27h, 20 March

    Hi Fil,i´ve been listening to the solo carefully and i´ve realised that there are two guitars sounding,so my question is,where you using an harmonizer pedal or you played both parts of the harmony?

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 18:39h, 20 March

      Well mate, the “other guy” is Tom Scholtz! 😆

      • avatar
        MrNachoplaza
        Posted at 18:53h, 20 March

        Ah, ok,but i´ve listened to the original tune (the solo part) and i can hear two guitars being played(actually I can not tell whether it was a harmony or the guitar was dubbed).Do you know if Tom used an octaver/harmonizer for his solos?

        • avatar
          JaiminhoPagina
          Posted at 19:43h, 20 March

          Most likely the solo was overdubbed.
          Harmonizer pedals sound somewhat “fake” because, with them, the interval between the original signal and the harmony is always the same (major 3rd, minor 3rd, 5th, etc) and sometimes the interval must be different in order to make the solo remain in the right key.
          As it’s a studio recording, the way to get the best result is by overdubbing. And since we are talking about Tom Scholtz…. We know that he always go for “perfection”. :)

          • avatar
            MrNachoplaza
            Posted at 19:48h, 20 March

            Ok thanks André 😉
            So it´s like in Thin Lizzy,right? (for example in the intro to Waiting for an Alibi)
            But then,who played the other part when in stage?

            • avatar
              JaiminhoPagina
              Posted at 20:04h, 20 March

              Yeah, I guess.

              Well…. Wasn’t there more than one guitar player in Boston? I didn’t memorize the name of all the members yet.

              Just looked up on wikipedia (lol). The line-up usually has two lead guitarrists (the original line-up being Scholtz and Barry Goudreal). Brad Delp could play guitar as well.

              So maybe in the studio it was Barry doing the harmony too.

              Thin Lizzy also had two guitarrists in the mid- late 70’s: Gary Moore and Brian Robertson.

              • avatar
                MrNachoplaza
                Posted at 20:08h, 20 March

                I guess Barry Goudreal is the guy with the SG of this video:

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiOqHLVxZvA

                Thin Lizzy had very good guitarrists (being John Sykes my favourite hehe) but his best era was with Brian Robertson and Scott Gorham (during that time the “Live and dangerous” was recorded)

                • avatar
                  banane
                  Posted at 20:21h, 20 March

                  Man, back then they knew how to grow moustaches hehe :)

              • avatar
                Atomic'76
                Posted at 22:03h, 20 March

                Yeah I think they went through about 5 or 6 guitarists maybe more!
                These two were awesome:

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_aYvfzylEQ

                • avatar
                  cevapcic
                  Posted at 01:00h, 21 March

                  I have always loved the Black Rose album with the late Gary Moore on guitar. Especially the B side of it. It was also my first Lizzy album :)
                  I would love to see someone do Black Rose, would be interesting as there are loads of little things and licks in that song.

    • avatar
      RockmanCentral
      Posted at 22:00h, 20 March

      More than likely, there are at least 2 rhythm guitars (1 panned left and 1 panned right), though there could be 4 or even 5 playing rhythm (2 left, 2 right, possible 1 more panned center). This was pretty standard practice for Tom.

      Additionally, there’s also at least 3 lead guitars. Again, 1 panned left, 1 panned right, and 1 panned center. During the solo you can hear where he lowers the volume of the 2 panned outside so that you can hear the 1 panned center.

      Tom generally doesn’t use harmonizers or octaves. I only know of one place where he may have used an octave, and that’s on the flanged rhythm solo in “Don’t Look Back”. Gary Phil, the other lead guitarist since the Third Stage album, does have a harmonizer that he uses during a solo he does on tour.

      The other guitarist from the 1st 2 albums was Barry Goudreau. He isn’t credited for much on the albums. He played the leads for “Let Me Take You Home Tonight” , “Longtime”, the intro and outro leads for “Don’t Look Back”, the leads on “Used To Bad News” and “Don’t Be Afraid”. Pretty much everything else was played by Tom Scholz (though some people dispute that).

      Some of Barry’s other works include his debut solo album, which ended up getting him kicked out of Boston. After that he had a band called “Orion the Hunter” and later another band called “RTZ”. All of these included at least some participation from Brad Delp, Boston’s lead singer. Where Brad isn’t singing, it was usually Fran Cosmo, another Boston alumni. He later teamed up with Brad again for “Delp and Goudreau”. BTW, Brad and Barry had a very close relationship since they were related by marriage (they married sisters).

      I highly recommend almost all of Barry’s stuff outside of Boston. It’s definitely a lot more raw than Tom’s compositions in Boston, but he is one hell of a guitarist and there are some real gems there with Brad singing.

  • avatar
    JaiminhoPagina
    Posted at 16:41h, 18 March

    Alright. I’ve just listened to the performance.
    As a whole, it left me amazed.
    But that vibrato at the very end of the solo. THAT made chills run down my spine – lol ;P

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 16:48h, 18 March

      A-ha, THAT is my signature :) Wanted to do something similar to The Rocker and even before, to “Gimme a Bullet”, but you know I wouldn’t dare “ruin” the original track. I would feel as a thief, or unrespectful to the original opera. Can’t do it. However, those few notes at the end I allowed myself to shove them in there 😀 Thank you :)

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 16:51h, 18 March

      BTW André, that type of vibrato (Kossoff/Angus) is definitely what brought me to playing guitar, more than 30 years ago. It’s what “ticks” me into it as well. If I could wish to be able to do just one thing on guitar, it would be “that” style vibrato. It’s not easy, takes a lot of time to get there (but it’s totally worth it; I too feel shivers down the spine while I do it every time!) and some finger strength, but the most of it is understanding the tricks to do it. And all of this, I will try and transfer to you guys.

      • avatar
        JaiminhoPagina
        Posted at 17:02h, 18 March

        Same with me Fil. Exactly the same.
        I often spend hours trying to improve my vibrato. The ironic thing is that when I try to record something afterwards my hand is so tired that the result sounds like crap – haha. XD
        It seems to me that every detail about it can make a difference: angle, grip, finger strength. As you said, it’s not easy. lol

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 17:08h, 18 March

          EVERY detail in fact counts. You will have to master everything consciously. BUT once you succeed (and you will) it will come to you, in the sense that you will adjust automatically for your vibrato instinctively, though you’ll still have to be in control. The vibrato particularly is one of those things that when you don’t do it right even for a split millisecond, the magnificent world of music will fall down immediately, and you and your listeners will hear it immediately.

  • avatar
    RockmanCentral
    Posted at 02:32h, 18 March

    Hi guys. Fil shot me an email and asked about re-posting some info from my website, RockmanCentral.com, and invited me to participate with you guys a bit. First of all, I want to say that that was a classy thing to do. So many people these days just copy and paste without asking. So right off, I love this guy!!

    As chance would have it, I had just stumbled across some of SoloDallas’ videos while I was researching the Metro amps. So the timing couldn’t have been better. Then I discover that he’s gotten a bit of the Boston bug, and whoa! Now were talking!! BTW, in case you haven’t heard, Boston is going on tour this summer, so check out BandBoston.com for tour dates.

    I got hooked on Boston when I was in 3rd Grade. All I had heard up till that point was Disco, so when I heard “Don’t Look Back” for the first time, I was floored!!! I had never heard rhythm guitars, harmony leads or vocals like that before in my life. Shortly after high school, I finally started learning to play guitar, and I’ve been researching Boston’s tone ever since.

    Now first of all, I want to freely admit that my guitar playing skills never really developed. The problem with being hooked on Boston is that you can never find the (minimum) 3 or 4 guys to learn the rest of the guitar parts to practice with. And as for someone that can sing like the late Brad Delp, forget it!!! So my approach has been to sequence in the drum tracks and other instruments, and then try to record the guitar tracks, one track at a time, until I could build up a song. Unfortunately, my technique sucks and it’s hell for me to get through a full song “clean”. But, like Tom Scholz, I’m tenacious (and I comp a lot 😉

    With that, I invite all of you over to RockmanCentral.com to read up on 20+ years of research into Boston’s sound. Although most of the site is dedicated to the Rockman gear, there’s lot’s of history, photo’s and even a few sound samples relating to Boston’s early years as well. From there, I’d be happy to try to answer (almost) any question you might have and see where this goes. In any case, I love to see/hear peoples cover tunes, so it would be great to see people (that actually know how to play) take whatever advice I can offer and do something with it.

    In the mean time, here’s a cover tune I did based on tracks from the Rockband game (more on that in time). Sorry for no video of me playing, but it would be hard to show 17 guitar tracks layered up!!! LOL!!!

    Enjoy!

    httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMwmMIhbgF4

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 07:02h, 18 March

      Bob please be Welcome here bro :)
      Thank you for accepting my invitation. Now, if there is anyone smart he’d take the chance to ask you a million questions like I would right now ( 😆 ).
      But the first practical one I am going to ask you immediately is: you suggested the Sustainor as the best solution (at its price that is) to get some real Boston tone. There’s one on ebay right now (wrongly called “Sustainer” by the auctioneer) that is going to USD 500 already. It’s the 200 model. Should I go for it? And how high should I bid? Additionally, do you know what microphones Boston used to record their first albums? And what console they tracked them and mixed onto? And what tape machine they used for tracking? Some interesting questions aren’t they? A-gain, thanks for being here with us!

      • avatar
        RockmanCentral
        Posted at 16:09h, 18 March

        Thanks Fil. Wow, you really DID have some questions lined up!! I’ll do my best to answer.

        All of the various Rockman’s have their own unique sound, though most people can’t tell them apart. The one pictured above is probably a Model IIB, the same model used to record parts of the Third Stage album. It was designed as a practice device, so there was no remote channel switching capability. Not a big deal if you are using it to record with, but not ideal for a performance.

        The Sustainor was designed for performers in mind, and provides a lot of flexibility in changing sounds and such. So, yes, it is probably the best unit for performing AND recording. But like I said, it DOES sound different (and quite noticeably so) from the headphone amps. There is a lot more Pre-Distortion EQ’ing built into it to give it that classic Boston “honk” in the midrange. However, you DO also have a dedicated Pre-Distortion effects loop so you can insert an EQ to alter that filtering.

        You mentioned it being a Model 200. This was a major revision over the Model 100, the most noticeable difference being improvements to the auto-clean circuit. Some “late model” 200’s (with a serial number > 19,571) also have what RockmanCentral has coined as the “Double IC mod”. This added the “lead-leveler” circuit, which greatly improved the performance of the compressor. Both are desirable so this is the model Sustainor I would recommend. If the Sustainor you mentioned is one of these late model “Double IC” Sustainors, then $500 is not an uncommon price point for these units. If it’s just a standard Model 200, then it might be a bit over priced.

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 16:31h, 18 March

          Thanks Bob. Really, many thanks. Okay, going to increase my bid on it right now – I don’t think it’s the IC one, but still I want one of the 200 models.
          I’ve just been outbid on it, but the out bidder has 0 feedback/auctions made, which made me suspicious.

          Regarding microphones used for recording and consoles for tracking, do you know any of that? CAN it be shared if so, or it would be better to have people read it at RockmanCentral.com? You know me Bob, I just know what it means to run a blog that has a lot of our work inside it… THANKS! Fil :)

          • avatar
            currentpeak
            Posted at 12:02h, 20 March

            Hey Fil,

            look what I accidentally found while browsing the net! You can get your Sustainor Model 200 upgraded to Double IC model.

            Scroll down to “PerfectSound Sustainor Lead Leveler (Double IC) Modification”:
            http://www.perfectsoundrockrefurbs.com/products.html

            I suppose Bob knows about this and can give you/us additional info :)

            • avatar
              RockmanCentral
              Posted at 14:27h, 20 March

              Oh yes, David and I go way back!! He is a great tech and diehard Rockman fan!! He can take your Rockman modules and bring them up to top performance. He can also do several mods, such as adding additional switching logic so you can select all 4 modes of the Sustainor via footswitch! (This is a mod that I came up with years ago and he later developed a similar mod to accomplish the same thing). He is very busy but if you can catch him at the right time, you won’t believe the sonic difference he can make to your Rockmodules.

            • avatar
              RockmanCentral
              Posted at 14:33h, 20 March

              I should also point out another highly talented and incredible obsessed Rockman fan. This guy has an incredible electrical engineering background and dissects every nuance of the circuits down and explains it in the most intimate details. His website http://www.rockman.fr/ takes what we started on RockmanCentral and runs with it in far greater detail. And despite being French, he’s a really nice guy too! 😉

              • avatar
                currentpeak
                Posted at 15:06h, 20 March

                Thanks for the comments!

                Yes, saw the French one, too! Looks like there is quite a few of Rockman gear obsessives :)

                P.S.: Love the last sentence regarding the French guy! 😀

                • avatar
                  RockmanCentral
                  Posted at 16:35h, 20 March

                  Well, they say that the French aren’t prejudiced.
                  They hate everyone equally!! 😉

                  Actually, I think they take pride in their “snobbery”.
                  It gives them an air of elitism.

                  Personally, I’ve had good relations with the few French I’ve met. So this is all in jest….

      • avatar
        RockmanCentral
        Posted at 17:25h, 18 March

        I have articles and interviews going back to the late 70’s, and it’s a LOT to wade through. Sometimes I’ll find an article where he mentions this or that, but it’s as of a certain point in time. For example, I know he started out on an old 4 track making demo’s, then later invested in a 12 track Scully deck. But I know for a fact that the debut album was tracked on a 24 track machine. So I’ll have to find the article that mentions it. I do know that by the time he had gotten the record deal, he had invested about $30,000 in gear, which, needless to say, was a LOT of money back then!

        Now, I do have interviews from around the time of the Walk On album, where he identifies what he’s using quite specifically. It’s very likely that he was using the same thing for back in the Third Stage era as well, and maybe even from the time of the debut.

        So, as of the 4th Boston album, he was using Scotch 226 tape on (2) 3M M79 24 track machines (one for the base tracks and the other for vocals and lead guitars) with an Audiotronix 501 board and a Fadex automation system.

        • avatar
          RockmanCentral
          Posted at 17:57h, 18 March

          OK, a little more research passed….

          I can confirm that he’s always used the same Scotch 226 tape, going back to the debut album. Looks like the same is true for the console and automation system. Given that, I would guess that he was using the same tape deck as well. He probably just added the 2nd one after the debut album.

          For the 12 string acoustic part on “More Than A Feeling”, he used a cheap imported Yamaha 12 string that he mic’d with a Electro-Voice RE-17. The drums (and I would guess the guitars as well) were mic’d with Sure SM57’s.

          Not sure if this will show up, but…

          Scholtz in the Studio

          • avatar
            SoloDallas
            Posted at 19:55h, 18 March

            Bob, WOW. THAT is info: thank you!
            With your permission (and due mention) I am posting this image up there in post, to be more visible (also, it’s huge).

            I see several things of interest here: tape machines, several Rockman units (several types?), one Urei 1176 Compressor, a Conn Strobe guitar tuner, a DBX (compressor) unit, the console which may be a Neve and several other things. THIS image is holy grail. Additionally, he seems to be holding an SG guitar, with what would appear to be as an original Di Marzio Super Distortion in at least the bridge.

            • avatar
              RockmanCentral
              Posted at 21:09h, 18 March

              Glad I could share it. I’ve got several other pictures of his studio, from various points in time. Even a few from the early days. I’ll dig those up when I get a chance…

              The guitar he’s holding is one of his 2 1968 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop’s. You can read more about them here…

              http://rockmancentral.com/RockmanCentral/Tour/LP.html

              Yes, Tom LOVES compressors!! Some say a little too much. And yes, he’s a big fan of the Strobe tuners.

              • avatar
                SoloDallas
                Posted at 21:14h, 18 March

                I need to remember to wear my eyeglasses 😆
                Well, I have this in common with him: I too LOVE compressors Bob. I don’t think it’s ever too much IF it sounds good, and he always made them sound terrific. Matter of fact Bob, in the original SVDS system I love so much (a Schaffer-Vega Diversity, also owned by Mr. Scholtz!) there is a terrific compressor. Love the thing so much that we are making a replica of the unit, audio-circuits only, not wireless. I also own a Strobe, same one from the same age. I love this stuff.

                • avatar
                  RockmanCentral
                  Posted at 21:48h, 19 March

                  Just a few details about all the “blue” you see in that picture.

                  Most of the blue modules you see are Rockman 12 band EQ’s. These EQ’s are unique in that they have tighter precision on the 7 mid frequencies, where you need the most control. He has banks of these EQ’s on each side of his mixing console; literally one on EVERY CHANNEL of his board!!

                  He also has several Chorus/Delay and Stereo Echo modules, which are probably assigned to Effects Sends. You’ll notice to left (behind him), there is a Rockman Modular Headcase sitting on top of a Rockman Speaker cab. Loaded in here is a Rockman XPR, Stereo Echo, Chorus/Delay, Smart Gate, MIDI Octopus and a Rockman 500 stereo amplifier.

                  I have my suspicions that the Rockman XPR may actually be a prototype Ultimatum Rack unit that never made it to production. That’s something I’ll have to ask him about the next opportunity I get (perhaps this summer).

  • avatar
    nitroangus23
    Posted at 02:00h, 18 March

    Fantastic playing,tone and over all performance Fil!!

    Gotta love Boston, and Tom always had a killer sound….just great!!

  • avatar
    gallanman
    Posted at 22:53h, 17 March

    Yeah!! You’ve got Boston’s song!!!
    I have a question: what is the fonction of the rockman? a compressor ?

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 22:57h, 17 March

      Compression and distortion into a “cheap” package. The professional “great sounding” unit is the Sustainor, but this is all I had right now and shot it with this.

      Compression is mild, almost non existent, but there is some.
      You then get some clean tones (4 sound modes) and some overdriven tones. The unit also sports a chorus and a delay.

      • avatar
        gallanman
        Posted at 23:11h, 17 March

        Ok!!!!
        In summary, relative to its function, the Rockman would approach with the SVDS therefore, in addition, other sound modes. Am I wrong?
        Think you do a test with SVDS and Rockman together?

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 19:48h, 19 March

          Oh yes I will test them together but the Rockman is hissy as hell, so I already know the combination of the two would have some noise. This was common back then anyway. I hope that my new unit, the Sustainor 200 will be more silent so to use it in conjunction with the SVDS and/or the Replica.

          • avatar
            gallanman
            Posted at 11:20h, 20 March

            I will, like you, really curious about the result of combining Sustainor / SVDS!!
            Why not test the reply, it might be interesting for those who want to combine the replica to other effect modules 😉
            A song by Boston in the lead for this test?
            I will think of this one: “More than a feeling” (I remember when you publish the cover on youtube with “smokin” a few of years!)

  • avatar
    MrNachoplaza
    Posted at 22:28h, 17 March

    Your covers are the best i can fin mate,great tone and playing.
    It would be great that someone worked on Paul Kossoff´s tone as you do,because his sound is terrific.Do you think you cand do that?

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 22:33h, 17 March

      Thanks mate, yes I think I can.
      I have been a Kossoff fan for the last 20 years and used to have a tribute band just for Free. I will do something from Free very soon!

      • avatar
        Hardrockerdave94
        Posted at 14:20h, 18 March

        I think you should cover the Hunter by Free, such an awesome song, plus it’s got some of Paul Kossoff’s best vibrato on it

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 14:34h, 18 March

          Yes used to cover that song with the band a long time ago: i was in a sort of free tribute band. I am into one sort of obscure song if theirs called “lady”. Know it? Will cover quite a few Free tunes shortly

          • avatar
            JaiminhoPagina
            Posted at 16:09h, 18 March

            Fil, “Lady” is actually a song of Paul Rodgers’ band “Peace”. 😛
            He created the band in 1971 during Free’s first break up with bassist Stewart McDonald and drummer Mick Underwood (Rodgers was doing the guitar work). It didn’t go forward, though. So, in 1972 he re-formed Free with the other guys in order to try to “save” Koss from his drug addiction.
            For some reason the song appeared in a few FREE compilation albums. Probably because of the indirect connection between the bands.

            • avatar
              SoloDallas
              Posted at 19:49h, 19 March

              André, you are MY rock historian. Would be lost without you :)
              Re-listened to Lady this morning, it’s just so wonderful. But today I re-played a version of Allright now that you’ll like.

              • avatar
                JaiminhoPagina
                Posted at 22:52h, 19 March

                haha. ;D
                You are a fun guy, Fil.

                Indeed. Listening to it now too. Very beautiful. Rodgers is a great songwriter, I must admit.

                Ah. Can’t wait to hear it! 😛

                By the way, have you thought about playing some other tunes like Woman, Mr. Big, I’ll Be Creeping, etc? (hard to pick the favourites – lol). I find the guitar work on many Free songs simply amazing. I especially love the Croydon and Sunderland shows (“Free Live! – with bonus tracks” and “Songs of Yesterday CD4″). The band was REALLY tight live.

              • avatar
                JaiminhoPagina
                Posted at 01:34h, 20 March

                But now I remembered…. Free DID rehearse the song for the Japanese tour in 1972 though (Songs of Yesterday CD 3), but without Koss.
                But they never actually recorded it in studio, so… well… I guess “Peace” is really the “original” – haha

                Hugs! :)

                • avatar
                  SoloDallas
                  Posted at 07:55h, 20 March

                  Yes I think it is SoY CD 3, the one that starts with vocals chorus… so Koss wasn’t there? Who played guitar there? Terrific rhythm work.

                  • avatar
                    JaiminhoPagina
                    Posted at 17:04h, 20 March

                    Paul Rodgers was playing the guitar during the 1972 Japanese tour (AND singing) because Koss was “unwell”.
                    At that point Free was a different band though. Andy Fraser had left and Tetsu Yamauchi was playing bass instead. John “Rabbit” Bundrick also joined and provided full-time keyboard work.
                    Right after the break-up in 1971, Koss entered in deep depression (he loved the band to death, ironically) and buried himself in that self-destructing path. They reformed the band trying to bring him back, but during and after 1972, he was still a wreck..
                    “Free at Last” was the last album with the original line-up and also the last album where Koss played the guitar all the way through. There are many horror stories about disastrous gigs or many instances where he couldn’t even get onstage and later tried to apologize to his bandmates, only to intoxicate himself with drugs once again afterwards.
                    Fraser was the first to give up (forcing the band to hire Tetsu and Rabbit) and later Koss also quit the tour to treat himself (right before the Japanese leg of the tour – so you guess what happened next). Rodgers and Kirke continued to try to save Koss by “dragging” the band with the new line-up.
                    The “Heartbreaker” recording sessions were the last straw. Kossoff played on a few tracks, but the band couldn’t wait for him to be well in order to finish the album (the “rehab” sessions weren’t working), so they hired a session musician, Snuffy Walden. Therefore, not every track from that point features Koss on guitar. Sometimes it’s either Rodgers filling in or it’s Walden trying to imitate him.
                    Then, there were other problems afterwards that finally destroyed what was left of the band (Koss listed as guest musician rather than a band member on the Heartbreaker sleeve – wich was a even more terrible blow to him – a disastrous US tour with Wendell Richardson replacing Koss, a fist fight between Rodgers and Rabbit…). By 1973, it was the end.
                    I know it sounds like a really bad sob-story, but it’s what it is.
                    Drugs are really a terrible thing, I must say.

                    • avatar
                      banane
                      Posted at 18:18h, 20 March

                      Great telling Andre, thanks. +1 on the drug stuff. A former friend of mine killed three people with his car because of drugs.

                    • avatar
                      Angusrocks
                      Posted at 18:31h, 20 March

                      drugs are horrible !!!

  • avatar
    Atomic'76
    Posted at 21:52h, 17 March

    Whoa man! Killer rock’n’roll song!

  • avatar
    Ant
    Posted at 21:42h, 17 March

    This reminds me of how broad your skills go, very much enjoyed this one :)

    Svds on this one? 😉

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 21:48h, 17 March

      Thanks mate :)
      Well I say again: it’s thanks to AC/DC. Learning AC/DC teaches timing, the most important thing for a musician. With that in our “bag of skills”, there ain’t no stopping.
      No SVDS here, as the Rocktron unit is hissy on its own, would have been too much even for a gate. As soon as I too get my replica, will hook it up. However, Tom Scholtz (Boston’s founder and main guitar player) DID have a SVDS that he used at least live…. and who knows, maybe also in the studio? Will investigate 😉

      • avatar
        Devil'Fingers"
        Posted at 22:51h, 17 March

        Timing- I know it’s really important, but sh**, I want to learn vibrato, to use it properly, without ” thinking”. Vibrato is such beautiful thing, but it’s so hard :( Practice? Only way to get it?
        (Great cover mate)

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 22:54h, 17 March

          I know, I am in the position to understand you perfectly.
          But I still think completely about the vibrato as I do it, just like everyone I think is as they do it: it’s a matter of uber concentration ( 😆 ) and some finger strength/training.
          But you WILL be thinking about what you’re doing. There is no “automatic” mode to switch on :)

          • avatar
            Devil'Fingers"
            Posted at 23:40h, 17 March

            You know what Fil, when one’s got perfect vibrato, it even LOOKS very “nice”, you can see that he’s got full control on it. This cover is an example.

  • avatar
    Tyler
    Posted at 20:08h, 17 March

    This put a big smile on my face Fil! I love that old boston stuff and it’s always been one of the guitar sounds I’ve been after. I can’t wait to start debunking boston’s guitar tone!

  • avatar
    Angusrocks101
    Posted at 19:22h, 17 March

    Nice playing and great tone. I’ve always liked how your recorded tones sound so professional even at the volumes you are playing. It’s like you recorded in a studio with a mixer. Great job.

    • avatar
      SoloDallas
      Posted at 21:56h, 17 March

      Thank you :) Well actually, it’s just like I had a mixer mate: I do everything “in the box” though, which is the tech term to indicate that I am recording AND mixing within protools.
      Thanks to emulation software such as Universal Audio (ProTools hardware & Plugins) I can “use” modules that simulate fantastic hardware of the past, such as, EQ consoles, compressors, reverbs, delays and tape emulators. And I do. On this one I used a Neve 1081 module to equalize the guitars. The sound won’t change drastically as in, if it sounds like scheisser “live”, it will be the same or worse with these plugins; hover IF recorded properly from a good source (the sound of my amps and guitars) really good results can be achieve, almost comparable with what was done in the studio. Many studios nowadays are shutting down for this very reason.

      • avatar
        Angusrocks101
        Posted at 22:40h, 17 March

        You’re still playing at like a watt or less though right? Even so it sounds as if your playing full power.

        • avatar
          SoloDallas
          Posted at 22:44h, 17 March

          Yes I am. Thanks to the Aracom. The Aracom is probably the best attenuator ever built. Add great Marshall speakers and great microphones and much of the work is done.

          • avatar
            banane
            Posted at 22:56h, 17 March

            Yes indeed. Heard it while I was playing in he lab. My Weber is also great, and I’m still happy with it, but the Aracom is indeed one level above. Really a superior attenuator.

            • avatar
              Angusrocks101
              Posted at 22:57h, 17 March

              When I get in my 20’s or so and i invest in a vintage 1959 I think I’ll look into getting an Aracom attenuator then.

              • avatar
                SoloDallas
                Posted at 23:02h, 17 March

                You do NOT need by any mean a vintage 1959.
                Metro – for example – does TERRIFIC replicas at a fraction of the price, and they DO sound like vintage Marshalls OR better.

              • avatar
                KyleSG
                Posted at 21:56h, 18 March

                SoloDallas is right but also keep late 70’s/early 80’s jmps in sight as well as they sound just as good as a vintage 59 and deals come up all the time online for them which are much cheaper then buying even a new marshall type amp of lesser quality.

          • avatar
            Angusrocks101
            Posted at 22:56h, 17 March

            Do you do something in the mixing to make it sound so loud and even if it didnt sound like the original ,which it does in this case, make it sound like it was the guitar recorded on the actual recording? And have you seen my Hells Bells cover?

            • avatar
              SoloDallas
              Posted at 23:01h, 17 March

              When you mix, you’ve already recorded the sound coming from your guitar. Is during recording that you make sure that you are getting a great sound, no matter the loudness, as the microphones have also a gain control that compensate for lower volumes. So once you got your sound in, it won’t matter if you were loud or not. You got “that sound”. What is not replicable yet is the speakers breakup.

              • avatar
                Angusrocks101
                Posted at 23:05h, 17 March

                I didn’t know that cause i never have recorded with microphones. And they make a Metro 1959 replica?

                • avatar
                  Angusrocks101
                  Posted at 23:37h, 17 March

                  I’ve been looking them up. Fully assembled they come to 3000+ but that’s what I would rather do because I wouldn’t ever try and put one together. Lol. The 1967 10,000 series seems to sound exactly like your 1959 in the video that you demonstrate the Aracom attenuator.

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